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THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

1948 




DEDICATION 

To Mr. Foster, our teacher and 
friend, in grateful appreciation for all 
the advice he has given us, we dedi' 
cate this issue of the Tattler. 



THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



EditofiivChief 
Assistant 

Business Manager 
Assistants 
Literary Editor 
Assistant 
Alumni Editor 
Sports Editor 
Exchange Editor 
Assistant 
Faculty Advisor 



STAFF 

Marilyn Williams 

Nancy Dunphy 

Viola Fraser 

Theresa LaCourse, Robert Durbin 

June Demerski 

Esther Loomis 

Ann LeDuc 

Howard Tiley 

Ruth Wells 

Palma Ingellis 

Miss Skrivars 



CONTENTS 

Dedication „ 2 

Senior Class Pictures 4 

Class Day Program 7 

Class History 8 

Class Will 8 

Class Prophecy „ 9 

Class Grinds 1 

Song Review 1 1 

Class Statistics 1 1 

Seniorscope 12 

Class of '49 1 3 

Class of '50 14 

Class of '51 15 

Editorials 16 

Literary 17 

Tattler 21 

Review Staff _ 2 2 

Forensic League 2 3 

Pro Merito 2 4 

Basketball 25 

Cheer Leaders 26 

Baseball 27 

Glee Club 2 7 

"Days of Youth" 28 

Junior Prom 29 

Alumni Notes 3 

Autographs 31 

Advertisements 32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




ROBERT FRANK COLLINS Prof. 

"Did nothing in particular, 
And did it very well." 
Class President 1; Treasurer 2: Tattler Staff 3; Prom Committee 
3; Christmas Ball Committee 3; Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3. 4; 
Stage Manager, Senior Class Play 4. Dramatic Club I. 

Reckless Facetious Callow 




JUNE CLAIRE DEMERSKI "Junie" 

"She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen." 
Revue Staff 2, 3, 4: Tattler Staff 4; Class Play 4; Basketball 4; 
Junior Red Cross 4; Prom Committee 3; Christmas Ball Com' 
mittee 3. 

Jolly Capable Dainty 




VIOLA JEWELL FRASER "Bylo" 

"Though she be but little she is fierce." 
Tattler Staff 2, 4; Revue Staff 1. 3, 4; National Forensic League 
2, 4: Basketball 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Play 4: Dramatic 
Club 2; Prom Committee 3; Junior Red -Cros.- 1, 2. 3. 4; 
Christmas Ball Committee 3; D.A.R. Good Citizen 4; Class 
President 2, 3. 4. 

Vigorous Jovial Frank 




PALMA SHIRLEY INGELLIS "Dolly" 

"Yes, an' no, an' inebbe, an' mebbc not." 
Class Secretary 3; Glee Club 1. 2; Revue Staff 3. 4; Tattler 
Staff 3, 4; Historian 4; Class Play 4; Prom Committee 3: Dra- 
matic Club 2: Chorus 3; Junior Red Cros- 1, 2, 3. 4; Christmas 
Ball Committee, 3. 

Priceless Slow Imaginative 



THE TATTL ER 




LAURA ROSE LLOYD "Skip" 

"Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, 
Men were deceivers ever;" 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Revue Staff 
2, 3; Tattler Staff 3; Prom Committee 3; Christmas Ball Com' 
mittee 3; Class Play 4; Vice President 2. 

Light-hearted Reluctant Lovable 




SHIRLEY MAE NICHOLS "Nick" 

"When found, make a note of" 
Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Chorus 3; Dramatic Club 2; National For- 
ensic League 2, 3; Declamations 2; N.F.L. State Tournament at 
Shrewsbury 2; Model Congress at Chicopee 3; Model Congress 
at A. I.C. 3; Revue Staff 4; Christmas Ball Committee 3; Prom 
Committee 3; Class Play 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Scholar Maggs Nice 




BARBARA JEAN OUTHUSE "Barb" 

"Four be the things I'd been better without: 

Love, curiosity, freckles, and doubt." 
National Forensic League 2, 3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Class 
Treasurer 3; Secretary-Treasurer 4; Class Play 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Christmas Ball Committee 3; Glee Club 1, 2; Chorus 
3; Revue Staff 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2; Declamations 2, 4; State 
Debate Tournament at Shrewsbury 2; Model Congress at Chic- 
opee 3: Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Chairman of Movie Com- 
mittee 4. 

Belligerent Jaunty Observing 




MAE LOUISE SANDERSON "Punk" 

"What news! what news? your tidings tell; 
Tell me you must and shall — " 
Glee Club 1, 2; Revue Staff 2, 3, 4; Class Play 4; Junior Red 
Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; Christmas Ball Committee 
3. 

Merry Lenient Sport 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




SHIRLEY JANE SHUMWAY "Jane" 

"She'd fight a rattlesnake and give it the first two bites." 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Historian 2, 3; Prom Committee 3; Christ' 
mas Ball Committee 3; Class Play 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 
4; Revue Staff 4. 

Sensitive Joyful Silly 




RUSSELL MILLER WARNER "Russ" 

"I can be pushed just so far." 
Glee Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior 
Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; Christmas Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Stage Manager of Class Play 4; Tattler Staff 3; Boys' 
State 3. 

Realistic Manlike Wise 




RUTH MARION WELLS "Ruthie" 

"Begone, dull Care! thou and I shall never agree." 
Junior Red Cross i, 2, 3, 4; Revue Staff 3, 4: Tattler Staff 4 
National Forensic League 2; Class Play 4; Glee Club 1, 2 
Chorus 3; Prom Committee 3: Christmas Ball Committee 3 
Dramatic Club 2; Declamations 2, 4. 

Radiant Mischievous Witty 




MARILYN ROWENA WILLIAMS "Fawn" 

"I can resist anything except temptation." 
Glee Club 1, 2; Chorus 3; Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic 
Club 2; National Forensic League 2, 3, 4; Declamations 2: 
Model Congress at A.I.C. 3; Model Congress at Chicopee 3; 
State Secretary of Junior Pro Mento 3; Pro Mento 3, 4; Revue 
Staff 3, 4; Tattler Staff 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; Christmas Ball 
Committee 3; Girls' State 3; Vice President of Class 3, 4; Class 
Play 4 State Debate Tournament at Shrewsbury 2. 

Merry Rugged Willing 



THE TATTLER 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY-TREASURER 
CLASS HISTORIAN 



Viola Fraser 

Marilyn Williams 

Barbara Outhuse 

Palma Ingellis 



CLASS NIGHT 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME 
CLASS HISTORY 
CLASS PROPHECY 
CLASS WILL 
CLASS GRINDS 



Viola Fraser 

Shirley Shumway 

Palma Ingellis 

Ruth Wells 

Robert Collins 



GRADUATION NIGHT ORATORS 
Our European Relations 
Our South American Relations 
Our Asiatic Relations 
The United States and the United Nations 



Marilyn Williams 
June Demerski 
Shirley Nichols 

Barbara Outhuse 



CLASS MOTTO — It's not whether you win or lose, it's how you play the game. 

CLASS COLORS— Blue and gold 

CLASS GIFT — Classroom bookcase 

CLASS FLOWER— yellow rose 



SENIOR CLASS 



ROBERT COLLINS 
*JUNE DEMERSKI 

* VIOLA FRASER 
PALMA INGELLIS 
LAURA LLOYD 

* SHIRLEY NICHOLS 



*BARBARA OUTHUSE 
MAE SANDERSON 
SHIRLEY SHUMWAY 
RUSSELL WARNER 
RUTH WELLS 

*MARILYN WILLIAMS 



Honor 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



K_s\ass Misto 



It was only four years ago in the year one 
thousand, nine hundred and forty four, that 
thirty three of us started on a long journey. So, 
early in September, we assembled the necessary 
equipment and set out. During the first few days 
we had difficulty in locating the correct road, 
\.hich would lead us to our destination. We fin- 
ally decided to travel on the one labeled "To 
Success." After traveling for nearly two months 
we were suddenly suppressed by another group 
and spent one night in unbelievable terror. The 
next day we felt a little better and decided to 
continue our journey. History had revealed that 
everyone traveling on this route had undergone 
a similar experience. After this event we chose 
Robert Collins as our leader. He showed us 
many short-cuts and easier methods of travel. 
Several of our group became discouraged and 
turned back, but the rest of us wearily trudged 
on, with little hope of ever reaching our desti- 
nation. 

The following year found us still fighting our 
way onward. It was rather rough, but with 
Viola Fraser as our new leader we had very 
little trouble. During this year, we had more 
time to enjoy our surroundings. We learned 
from our scouts that there were two expeditions 
ahead of us and one behind us. Several of our 
group decided at the end of this year to join 
those trailing us. We now had only twenty 
three left in our band. 

The third year of our adventure became much 
easier. Viola was still our able leader and di- 



ISIOFLJ 

rector. As there was now only one group ahead 
of us, this could mean only one of two things: 
either we were headed for a terrible disaster or 
we would reach "Success" and start a new life. 
During this year we also discovered that we had 
four able leaders among us: Shirley Nichols, 
Marilyn Wiliiams, Barbara Outhuse, and June 
Demerski, who were given badges of merit for 
the success they had attained thus far on their 
journey. Before we realized it another year had 
passed. 

During our last year of adventure many of 
us became restless. Some even wandered from 
the path to seek new interests, but later decided 
to return to complete the journey. One of our 
group suffered a fatal fall, which cut our num- 
ber to twelve: ten girls and two boys. To com- 
plicate matters, we took a wrong turn on the 
trail and soon found ourselves in a large, excit- 
ing city. Since we were there, we decided to 
have a good time, and we did. After several 
enjoyable days, we wearily retraced our steps to 
the original path. We traveled on with renewed 
interest until we came into a wide clearing. 
From every direction came our parents, friends, 
and relatives, who welcomed us to a new and 
strange way of life. We had now finished four 
years of exploring and struggling — years which 
we shall never forget — the foundation for our 
lives in the future. 

Shirley Shumway 

Class of "48" 



Class Will 



We, the intelligent and dignified "twelve" 
of Williamsburg High School, not knowing the 
certainty of our future, do make this our last 
will and testament. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave a separate file for 
the seniors' absence excuses. 

To Mr. Merritt we leave a permanent office 
girl, so that he won't have to do his own typ- 
ing and bookkeeping. 

To Mr. Foster we leave our love and ap- 
preciation for being a real pal during our stay 
here at "Burgy" high. 

To Miss Skrivars we leave a little red wagon 
so that she can pull her pocketbook around in- 
stead of piling it on all her books. 



To Mrs. Gnnnell we leave our sincere thanks 
and appreciation for being a fine friend and 
leader. 

To Mr. Branch we leave a life movie contract 
with M.G.M. Studio. We are very sure he can 

it. 

To Mr. Williamson we leave a soap box so 
that he can continue his oratorical work with 
next year's English IV class. We think this will 
save the corner of his desk. 

To Mr. Warner and Mr. Bisbee we leave a 
special elevator so that they won't have to carry 
their pails, rags, and cleaners up three flights 
of stairs. 



THE TATTL £R 



Laura Lloyd leaves to Anne Sabo her way of 
hating men and /Still being able to get her dates 
crossed. 

Shirley Nichols leaves John Maggs to any- 
one who dares to take him. 

Barbara Outhuse leaves her frequent dates 
with Kent to Nancy Dunphy and her infre- 
quent dates with Tony to Jean Ellen Harlow. 

Russy Warner leaves to Ray Morin his stub- 
born way with people. 

Marilyn Williams and Bobby Collins leave a 
large bottle of ammonium sulfide to Bobby Dur- 
bin so that he can show next year's chemistry 
class how to experiment on new English teach- 
ers as they did in our junior year. 

Mae Sanderson wills to Audrey Filkins her 
clever way of picking up news and keeping it 
until penmanship period. 

Ruth Wells leaves her frequent telephone 
calls from N. Y. to any one who dares to take 
them. 

June Demerski leaves her quiet ways to David 
Kendall if he thinks that he can use them. 

Barbara Outhuse, Marilyn Williams, and Ruth 
Wells leave to Nancy Dunphy, Theresa La 
Course and Esther Loomis their ability to be 
able to talk all day and still find something to 



talk about all night. 

Bobby Collins leaves his way with girls to 
Alfred Papineau. 

Palma Ingellis leaves to Mary Sroczek her 
congenial way of getting along with people and 
enjoying it. 

Viola Fraser leaves her ability to go steady 
with one fellow for four years, to Alice Curtis, 
that is if she wants it. 

Shirley Shumway leaves to John Brisbois her 
way of getting things done. 

The Senior Class leaves, thank goodness!!! 

We draw this our last will and testament to 
a close, and further state that there shall be no 
additions, codicils, erasures or other evasions 
thereunto since we have bequeathed our posses- 
sions and treasures to those heretofore men- 
tioned. 

Witness our hand and seal, given at the 
auditorium of Williamsburg High School this 
16th day of June in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and forty eight. 

Signed — The Senior Class of 1948. 
Witness: 

Sara Bellum 
Medula Oblongata 
Sara Brum 



Lylass Ppoph 



June 12, 1960 



As my plane took off from La Guardia Air- 
field in New York, I happened to glance at a 
calendar. The date was June 12th, and I said 
to myself: "J ust think, it was nearly twelve 
years ago that I graduated from good old 
'Burgy High'." 

This immediately made me think of all 
my dear old school friends. I had not heard 
from any of them for over two years. I had 
finished my training and was now a stewardess 
on a passenger plane. 

As I was having these fond recollections, the 
plane happened to hit an air pocket and a 
woman in the front seat of the plane screamed. 
I ran up to assist her. I could tell from the 
expensive clothes that she was wearing that 
she was quite a wealthy woman, and I gave a 
gasp of surprise, when I saw that this woman 
was JUNE DEMERSKI, my old school chum. 
I talked with her for the rest of the trip, a::d 
June said that she had to get off in Kentucky 
to meet her husband, Mr. Howard Vanderbilt. 



pnecij 

We said good-bye and my plane took off for 
our next scheduled flight to Wyoming. After we 
had landed there, I was standing by the wing 
of the airplane when I heard my name called 
out in a deep male voice. I turned around and 
whom did I see refilling the airplane tank with 
gas but RUSSELL WARNER. He told me he'd 
been working there for quite some time and 
now was a full-fledged mechanic. I talked with 
him for half an hour before I had to say good- 
bye because the plane was scheduled to take 
off. 

As we started, a car zoomed up and a blonde 
girl jumped out. She barely made the plane. 
After I had helped her in, I recognized this 
blonde girl as BARBARA OUTHUSE, who al- 
ways used to be late in her school days and still 
was. She said she was going to California to 
take over her new position as physical educa- 
tion teacher at U.C.L.A. As Barbara and I 
were talking of our old school-days, the girl a. .J 
boy sitting in front of us turned around. It 
wasn't until we looked twice that we recognized 



10 



WILLJAMSBLfRG HIGH SCHOOL 



VIOLA FRASER and ROBERT COLLINS. 
What a reunion! Prof told us that he had fin- 
ally succeeded in getting Viola to marry him 
after years of pleading. They were going out 
West to start their new home. The plane landed 
in California and after our good-byes, we went 
our separate ways. Since I had a week to spend 
in Hollywood, I went to the MGM studio to 
watch a day's production of the movie "Joseph- 
ina." As I saw the star of the movie come onto 
the scene, I was surprised to see MARILYN 
WILLIAMS. After the shooting was over, I 
went up to talk to her. She told me that she 
had starred in a few plays after high school and 
then had been offered a movie contract. I was- 
n't too surprised at her success, having seen her 
in our high school play "Leave It To The 
Girls." That night Marilyn took me to the night 
club called the "Brown Derby." As we were 
seated and had started to enjoy our meal, a 
very distinguished looking woman came in and 
sat at the next table. Marilyn and I jumped up 
and ran over to shake hands with RUTH 
WELLS! As we sat at her table chatting, Ruth 
told us that she was waiting for her husband, 
Herby Dir.smore, to join her. We. weren't too 
surprised to hear that she was married, as she 
had liked the boy ever since her high school 
days and he had kept her busy with phone 
calls and letters. This delightful week in Cali- 



fornia over, I reported to the ship for our sched- 
uled flight overseas to Australia. During my 
three-hour rest period in Australia, I decided to 
go swimming. While I was resting on the beach 
1 saw a woman who looked familiar. I stared 
at her, knowing that I had seen her before. 
It wasn't until she jumped into the water that 
I recognized her; or I should say I recognized 
the bathing suit, for it was the same one that 
LAURA LLOYD had worn when we had gone 
swimming in Burgy in 1948. She told me that 
she had just received a letter from MAE SAN- 
DERSON, who was very successful as assistant 
president of Sears, Roebuck and Company. I 
spent the remainder of my three hours with 
Laura and then reported for our flight to the 
United States. Although we didn't have many 
passengers going over, we had several Army 
nurses coming back. 

I happened to recognize SHIRLEY NICH- 
OLS and SHIRLEY SHUMWAY as the two 
nurses sitting across the aisle. They finally rec- 
ognized me and after shaking hands I asked 
them where they were stationed and how long 
they had been there. They got off at Alabama 
where they had been stationed together for the 
past two years. On my way back to Massachu- 
setts for my two weeks vacation, I was very 
happy, for I had seen or heard from all my 
former classmates. 



Now I won't beat around the bush, 
Your imagination I will not push, 
To impress our deeds upon your minds 
Here is the news of our class in grinds. 



LJass Carina! 



Hatfield dances on Saturday night, 
Shirley and Marion used to fight. 
The trouble was to get a date 
With Russell Warner — the shiek of '48. 



My first victim is the girl 
Who's always pushing back that curl. 
But she's a great friend just the same 
Barbara Outhuse is her name. 



Eating candy and skipping school 
Every day it's the same old rule 
But she did well on the English quiz 
Palma Ingellis — she's a whiz. 



You seldom find her to be free, 
She's all wrapped up in Chemistry. 
Shirley Shumway we call her here, 
Ask the boys . . . she's a dear. 



Who's that girl, coming in late? 
Why, the clock says almost 9:08! 
Must be to wake her it takes two bells 
Now we know, it's Ruthic Wells. 



Who joys the boys? Who thrills the Jills? 
The charming lass with the ways and wills. 
Sometimes noisy and sometimes cool 
Viola Fraser is fond of school. 



She walks down to Hickey's in the pouring rain 
While Johnny is calling her house in vain. 
Everyone knows she's the life of the class 
Mac Sanderson is this lively lass. 



THE TATTLER 



11 



She's quiet, she's cute, she goes out in a Ford 
And comes home in a Buick. (Think she's 

bored?) 
June Dcmerski is the one 
She's a sure sign of fun. 

Now here's the wizard of '48 
And with the teachers, does she rate! 
Not only with them but Johnny too, 
It's Shirley Nichols, believe me you! 

She giggles and laughs, she's a riot all day, 
She knows how to mix school-work with play, 
A '46 Studebaker . . . right front. seat. 
It's Marilyn Williams and she's hard to beat. 



The Goshen bus gets quite a treat 
When it's this girl that they stop to meet. 
But when you know her as most of us do, 
Laura Lloyd is a friend so true. 

To write about one's self is tough, 
You can't write all the usual stuff. 
You sign your name and so, you see, 
It's Robert Collins, yours truly, or, me. 

All good things must come to an end, 
So, before we start our outward trend, 
We look around and say good-bye 
To the faculty and good old Burgy High. 



LJass otatist 



Bluffer 

Genius 

Clown 

Wittiest 

Grind 

Most lovable 

Fickle in love 

Most popular 

Best-all-around 

Most charming personality 

Most dependable 

Most obstinate 

Most critical Shirley Shumway 

Most businesslike 

Most bashful 

Most quiet 



Robert Collins 

Shirley Nichols 

Ruth Wells 

Robert Collins 

Shirley Nichols 

Laura Lloyd 

Palma Ingellis 

Palma Ingellis 

Viola Fraser 

Laura Lloyd 

Viola Fraser 

Marilyn Williams 

Barbara Outhuse 

Mae Sanderson 

June Demerski 

June Demerski 



ISIICS 

Most argumentative 

Most believing 

Most talkative 

Best athlete 

Sr. who has done most 

Most ladylike 

Noisiest 

Class gossip 

Class actress 

Woman Hater 

Man Hater 

Most likely to succeed 

Class sheik 

Class vamp 

Class orator 

Jolliest student 



Marilyn Williams 

Viola Fraser 

Marilyn Williams 

Russell Warner 

for W.H.S. Viola Fraser 

June Demerski 

Palma Ingellis 

Mae Sanderson 

Marilyn Williams 

Russell Warner 

Laura Lloyd 

Shirley Nichols 

Russell' Warner 

Shirley Shumway 

Barbara Outhuse 

Ruth Wells 



Jonq W 



>onq 

Mr. Merritt — "Gentleman Friend" 
Miss Dunphy — "Just One More Chance"' 
Mrs. Grinnell — "My Favorite Friend" 
Miss Skrivars — "For Every Man There Is A 
Woman" 

Mr. Foster — "Too Marvelous For Words" 

Mr. Branch — "Anything For You" 

Mr. Williamson — "Say Something Nice About 

Me" 
Mr. Warner &? Mr. Bisbee — "You Can't Make 

Money Dreaming" 
Class of '49— "Dreaming" 
Class of '50 — "How Soon" 
Class of '51 — "A Miracle Can Happen" 



evievv 

Seniors — "Hooray-Hooray I'm Going Away" 
Graduation — "Good News" 
Laura — "You Belong To My Heart" 
Mae — "That's My Desire" 

Palma--"Ooh! Look A There, Ain't She Pretty" 
Viola — "My Old Flame" 
Prof— "A Fellow Needs a Girl" 
June — "When I Was Sweet Sixteen" 
Ruth— "On The Sidewalks Of New York" 
Russy — "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" 
Shirley S. — "Thoughtless" 
Shirley N. — "Oh Johnny! Oh Johnny!" 
Barbara — "I Still Get Jealous" 
Marilyn — "You Don't Have To Know The 
Language" 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



















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THE TATT L ER 



13 



Class of 1949 




Front Row left to right — M. Sroczek, A. Sears, H. Tiley, D. Golash, A. LeDuc, T. La Course, 

D. Shumway, I. Ferron 

Back Row left to right — J. Baldwin, L. Richardson, A. Papineau, F. Vaillanccurt, R. Durbin, 

E. Loomis, N. Dunphy, R. Merritt 

PRESIDENT— Ann LeDuc VICE-PRESIDENT— Theresa LaCourse 

SECRETARY— Dorothy Golash TREASURER— Howard Tiley 

HISTORIAN— Raymond Morin 



JUNIORS' HYMN 

Three years are gone and only one 
Is left for our hard work and fun 
We're bound to separate at last 
And look and smile upon our past 
But still we have our one year left 
To work and try to do our best 
We realize, as juniors now 
That we must try to win somehow 
To show our helpers down the lane 
That all their work was not in vain. 



Nancy Dunphy 



14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Class of 1950 




Front Row left to right — A Curtis, J. Colson, A. Sincage, H. Warner, A. Warner, M. Johnson, 
A. Sabo, R. Ice 

Second Row left to right — R. Sharpe, H. Nye, M. Wells, S. Magdalenski, A. Barker, L. Barnes, 
E. Outhuse, E. Richardson, R. Liimatainen. 

Third Row left to right — P. Morin, H. Bisbee, C. Warner, P. Culver, C. Mollison, W. Curtis, 
R. McCord, D. Baldwin. 



PRESIDENT— Allen Warner 
SECRETARY— Ann Sabo 



VICE-PRESIDENT— Marion Johnson 
TREASURER— Henry Warner 



HISTORIAN— Anna Mac Sincage 



CLASS OF 1950 

We are just a happy bunch 
During school and leisure hours 
Especially while eating lunch 
And in the little rainy showers. 

We have been told so many times 
To stop our little silly pranks 
But this I shall add to my rhymes 
We all belong to different ranks. 

Even though we're noisy and gay 
We also try to be thrifty 
You can always see some sort of play 
In the class of nincteen-fifty. 



Marion Johnson 



THE TATTLER 



15 



Class of 1951 




Front Row left to right: M. Pomeroy, S. Hathaway, J. Bachand, J. Baldwin, D. Brewer, 
J. Brisbois, D. Tiley, B. Ray, R. Bisbee, I. Roberge, J. Hathaway 

Second Row left to right — J. Magdalenski, B. Durbin, I. Matrishon, B. Fitzroy, A. Filkins, 
J. Harlow, M. Shay, J. Smith, M. Graves, M. Black, B. Hathaway, L. Penfield, J. Maggs 

Third Row left to right — F. Pringle, A. Brown, D. Hillenbrand, R. Snape, N. Brisbois, F. Barron 
N. Tiley, R. Duffy, A. Kolosewicz, D. Bates, G. Sears, D. Kendall 



PRESIDENT— David Tiley 
SECRETARY— Dorothy Brewer 



VICE-PRESIDENT— John Brisbois 
TREASURER— Burke Ray 



HISTORIAN— Ruth Bisbee 



"CLASS OF '51" 

In this picture you will see, 

Future leaders of democracy. 

Bakers some, actors others, 

Surely models, teachers and mothers. 

There's just one thing I shall admit, 

That all our teachers have kept their wit, 

But we all love to have our fun, 

This rowdy class of "51". 



Jean Ellen Harlow 



16 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Edito 



•WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN 
AMERICAN" 



To be an American, in my opinion, is to 
be a part of the greatest nation in the world. 
It means you are able to express fully your 
thoughts and wishes about any and all sub- 
jects. In most countries of the world your 
future depends mostly upon what color and 
creed you are. In these United States it 
doesn't matter whether your name is Steinberg 
or O'Reilly, for all men were created equal 
in the eyes of God, and here we realize that, 
and this is the basis of the foundation of our 
whole American system. We are a democratic 
country, and can and will never resort to any 
such cruel power as Communism which is so 
powerful in Europe today. We are a country 
that will stop at nothing to keep our ideals high 
and to help other unfortunate people of the 
world to maintain theirs also. When you lift 
your head and say, "I am an American," be 
proud and think, "I shall always do unto others 
as I would have them do unto me." This pledge 
and others like it would lead to peace among 
all men and nations of the world. 

Nancy Dunphy 



AT THE JOURNEY'S END 
At last we have reached the end of our jour- 
ney, having just completed our last four 
years, the hardest part of it. Twelve years is a 
long time to study and to prepare, but now we 
are through. 

We have come to the parting of our ways 
and now each must travel separately. We will 
not be lonely, for we shall meet other travelers 
who have chosen the same road. Perhaps the 
faces will not be familiar and the traveling will 
not be as easy, but having had twelve years' 
experience we shall survive. 

We will learn many new things and acquire 
a new sense of values. These things will make 
our journey much easier and enable us to teach 
others what we have learned. 



rials 

Perhaps some day our paths may cross and 
we shall be together again. Should this not hap- 
pen, \vc will not feel too disappointed, for we 
will still remember the best four years of our 
lives — the time when we traveled together. 

Marilyn Williams 



RACIAL ANTAGONISM 

In the United States today there exists a 
critical problem, that of racial prejudice. It is 
serious not only in the United States, but also 
in most of the larger nations of the world, for 
international trade and commerce make the 
problems of one nation, the problems of the 
entire world. 

Our conflicting racial policies make it in- 
creasingly difficult for those who have looked to 
America as a land of hope to find the freedom 
of opportunity of which our country boasts. 
Each day we read of the boycotting of a busi- 
ness because of racial sympathies. We hear of 
the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, which practices 
malicious injustices against other races. We see 
the forming of distinct racial sections in our 
towns and cities, because a certain few refuse 
to mingle with the supposedly inferior Foreign- 
ers, Negroes, and Jews. We, the people of the 
United States, claim to believe in democracy — 
that every man is equal regardless of race, 
creed, or color. This segregation causes conflict 
between our professed democratic doctrines and 
our actual day-by-day living. 

I believe that education is the most hopeful 
solution of all American Race relations. By 
education we hope to broaden our general 
viewpoint and. in so doing to rid ourselves of 
the corruption brought about by racial preju- 
dice. Relief may also come from religious influ- 
ence and the acquisition of political power on 
the part of the Negro. 

Today, wc who live in America want peace. 
We profess to believe in One World. Yet if we 
cannot live harmoniously together here, how 
can we expect it elsewhere? 

Viola Fraser 



THE TATTLER 



17 



Lit 



THE CONSTITUTION AND 
THE CHANGING WORLD 



In the latter part of the eighteenth century, 
the fathers of a newly independent frontier 
drew up a code of laws and government that 
was to be the basis of a new, free nation — the 
United States of America. At that time, our 
country was composed of thirteen sparsely-set- 
tied colonies. The rest of the world looked upon 
us as patriarchs look upon the yearling. 

Now, nearly two centuries later, those thir- 
teen colonies have developed into one of the 
greatest powers in the world; their original 
natural resources have proved a basis for great 
industrial developments; their first four million 
people have grown one-hundred and forty mil- 
lion strong; and our government under their 
Constitution has developed socially, economical- 
ly, and politically until it is noted throughout 
the world. 

And the World? It has changed considerably 
too. The greater part is composed of war-torn 
countries, torn again from within by their in- 
abilities to solve their own social problems; in- 
capable of even considering that greater prob- 
lem of World Peace. The world is filled with 
starving people, people who have lost their 
place in the world; people who fear the future. 

Has our Constitution kept up with the times? 
Now, nearly three years after World War II, 
America is faced with more new, impending 
problems than ever before. These problems may 
not necessitate the changing of our Constitution 
intentionally, but in trying to solve them we 
are becoming so involved that no one can pre- 
dict what will happen in the future. 

Blessed with natural resources, our country 
became great in industries. As always, some 
men were born to lead, others to follow, .and in 
those industries gradually took place the differ- 
entiation between capital and labor. Now our 
country, while trying to establish a world peace, 
is teeming with industrial strife within. The gap 
between capital and labor has become too great. 

The United States has also become a great 
economic power. The only extensive provision 
in our Constitution concerning economics is the 
granting of the privilege to Congress to loan, 
borrow, and levy taxes. Yet we have become 
so powerful economically and have loaned so 
much to the war-torn world for recovery that 
our own economic system, recovering from war 
itself, is tottering upon the brink of destruction. 



erarij 

Prices since the war verge on inflation. Under 
our Constitution the Government has no right 
to directly control either prices or production. 
What is to come in the future? The maintenance 
of our whole government depends considerably 
upon its economic stability. 

There are few of us who can deny the feasi- 
bility and reasoning in the terms of the Con- 
stitution. Yet in this changing world, are we 
following it as closely as we were meant to? Our 
forefathers wrote our Constitution in simple 
terms — in simple language meant solely for the 
people. That Constitution gives us as Ameri- 
cans more freedom, liberty, and hope to that 
eternal goal of peace and happiness than the 
people of any other country ever dreamed of. 
We modern Americans take these things for 
granted. During the last war, many of us were 
shocked into sudden realization of what we were 
in danger of losing. And now, that war being 
materially won, have we slipped back into the 
old rut? Is that why we aren't succeeding in 
winning the peace? 

The average American is shamefully ignor- 
ant of his social problems. He has made another 
inexcusable error in becoming too class-con- 
scious. As a result, our country is composed of 
great social and economic extremes. There are 
huge, wealthy cities, their slum populations out- 
numbering that of the socially independent. 
Statistics show that there are large settlements 
of subnormal and illiterate mountaineers in the 
southern part of our country. There is the 
Negro. A single amendment to the Constitution 
set him free from bodily servitude, but he can 
never be free from the prides and prejudices of 
the American people. 

We Americans, who are so proud of our lib- 
erties and equalities, remain oblivious to the 
problems of these people. 

Our Constitution was written for thirteen 
isolated colonies whose only foreign connection 
was that with their ex-mother country, England. 
Now we have communications capable of reach- 
ing every corner of the world. We have our 
choice of transportation by land, air, or sea. 
From this we may reach only one conclusion — 
we can no longer avoid the world. Year after 
year, war after war, America has had practical- 
ly no foreign policy at all. The late Woodrow 
Wilson became famous for his conceptions of 
world peace and unity — yet most of his ideas 
were rejected. Man has created so many diaboli- 



18 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



cal inventions to destroy his fellow men that 
the United States, among other countries, must 
maintain some kind of a foreign policy to avoid 
future war. Adequate and fair trade agreements 
would be a big step in the direction toward 
world peace. 

But in this search for brotherhood in the 
world who should come first: the world or 
our own country? The war-torn countries con- 
tinually plead for loans of food, money, or 
clothing. Should we Americans answer their 
pleas in spi:e of our own economic instability? 

Should we allow huge quotas of refugees into 
our country each year when we are encountering 
such a housing shortage that many of our own 
countrymen are practically homeless? Should 
we think of the world or our country first? 

Yes, fellow Americans, there is much ahead 
of us. Our Constitution has seen us through 
the ul.imate in progress; it has seen us through 
many wars, each greater in intensity; its rights 
and privileges have established America as a 
promised land. And it must see us through a 
lasting peace. 

However, there are some things that must 
never change if America is to emerge unchanged 
in the end. The first are those immortal funda- 
mentals given us by our forefathers that have 
proved themselves so successfully in the past. 
The second is something living yet intangible; 
something that can never be adequately de- 
scribed by words, yet that something has helped 
America become what it is. We must see that 
this spirit never dies, and that our Constitution 
never becomes just another written document to 
be laid aside and forgotten. 

And then, if it is humanly possible to avoid 
war in the future, we can use our Constitution 
as a living example of what a code of liberty and 
freedom can do in a changing world. 

Anne Sabo '51 



STRANGER IN THE HOUSE 

Most of us, at one time or another, have been 
that most unfortunate of all people, the week- 
end or "weakened" guest. After the week-end, 
you all say that you have had a most wonderful 
time. Perhaps you did, most likely you didn't. 
Allow me to tell you that when I was a week- 
end guest, I had a most unwonderful time. 

It all started, quite naturally, with an invita- 
tion. Oh, quite naturally. I received this unex- 
pected document on an unexpected date at an 
unexpected time. So, quite naturally, I did the 
unexpected thing. I accepted. Later I was 
shocked at what I had done. 

At any rate, I was looking forward to that 



week-end with great joy. That visit would 
mean a rest from the trials and tribulations 
of housework. Besides I hadn't seen Mr. and 
Mrs. I. M. Able for several years. In fact, when 
I last saw them they were on their honeymoon 
and . . . hmmm, that was about five or six years 
ago Oh my! 

Well, to get along, I packed a few things in 
a few bags and bought a few tickets. I locked 
my door, said good-bye to a few friends and I 
was — off! 

The trip had to be made partly by train and 
partly by bus. For the most part, this trip was 
uneventful. I lost myself only twice. 

As was expected, Ivan and Martha were wait- 
ing for me when I got off the bus. There were 
the usual greetings that one gives to friends that 
one has not seen for some time. Then they took 
me to the house. There I got a "nice" surprise. 

As I said, I hadn't seen Ivan and Martha for 
five or six years. When I entered that house, 
pandemonium broke loose. Why? In those five 
or six years Ivan and Martha had acquired a 
pair of twins and a set of triplets (in children 
of course). Those five "darling" children 
swarmed all over me asking for candy, boats, 
ice cream, electric trains, dimes, nickels, quar- 
ters, and could I make an atom bomb? It sud- 
denly seemed that this week-end was not going 
to be a bed of roses. Believe me, it wasn't. 

1 soon found that to be a week-end guest, one 
must be qualified to be (1) a nursemaid; (2) a 
housekeeper; (3) an expert at cards. 

First, I was called upon to be a housekeeper. 
It seemed that their housekeeper had just left, 
and there would be no one to cook dinner be- 
cause the housekeeper did all the cooking, and 
perhaps we could go out to eat, but who would 
mind the "darling" children? I wound up in the 
kitchen cooking ham and eggs for eight (people 
of course). I had to wash the dishes, too. Not 
that I minded, of course, but .... 

That same night they sprang the bad news. 
We were all invited to the country club for an 
annual dance of some sort, but they had no one 
to mind the "darling" children, and they were 
sorry, but it seemed as if they couldn't go unless 
o'ic of us stayed home, and Martha was just 
dying to go. I stayed home with the "darling" 
children. Anyone who has been a baby-sitter 
can tell you what I must have gone through. 
Not that I minded, of course, but .... 

The next afternoon Martha had her bridge 
club at her house for . . . guess what? A bridge 
game of all things^ Whoever heard of a bridge 
club playing bridge? Well, as it happened, one 
of the bridge fanatics had a sprained wrist or 
some such wrist ailment and couldn't play 



THE TATTLER 



19 



bridge. I happened to be around. I got drafted 
I didn't know a trump from an ace in the 
hole, but they had a gay time teaching me how 
to play; I had a horrible time learning how to 
play. Not that I minded, of course, but .... 

Of course, there was a bright side to this 
visit. For instance, where else could I have pos- 
sibly found such a ducky attic to clean out, or 
such gorgeous beds to make? Where else (out' 
side of my own home) could I be in complete 
charge of the kitchen? Where else, I ask you, 
where else could I find such beautiful hardwood 
floors to polish? (ooch! my back) 

Undoubtedly you are not believing me as I 
write this informative piece of paper, but, tell 
me, pal, how wonderful a time did you have the 
last time you were a weakened guest? 

The final paragraph must always have a moral. 
Mine is as follows: 
To hosts and hostesses: 

Be kind and gentle with your week-end guest, 

Or another friend you will have to quest. 
To week-end guests: 

Don't weaken to hints of the host, 

Or you'll soon give up your weakened ghost. 

By Mary Sroczek '49 

OUR GREAT AMERICAN HERITAGE— 

What is liberty? The dictionary defines it as 
freedom or privilege, the right to do what you 
please. However, before discussing what it 
means to us today, let us see what it meant to 
our forefathers. 

When the Pilgrims and Puritans came to this 
country, they were searching for liberty. They 
wanted the right to do a few things that they 
wanted. In England they had to do as the king 
commanded. They had to worship God as he 
did. Any other way was punishable. They re- 
sented this and set out to find a place for 
themselves in the world where they could live 
without fear of persecution. 

However, even in this country they were not 
completely free, for only church members might 
have a say in the government. This was not the 
liberty they wanted. However, things changed 
for the better. 

Then England stepped in, not wanting to miss 
the opportunity to get the most out of her pos- 
sessions, and began to rule with an iron hand. 
Our colonists resented this oppression and 
sought to free themselves from the yoke of Eng- 
land. When England began taxing the colonists 
beyond their endurance, is it any wonder the 
motto of American colonial newspapers was 
"The united voice of all His Majesty's free and 
loyal subjects in America — liberty and property, 
and no stamps." 



They had to do something, and they did. 
They fought. Out of this came our American 
Revoution. Following this we formed a govern- 
ment based on the principles in which we be- 
lieve. 

Later our liberty was questioned when the 
problem of slavery arose. Some wondered wheth- 
er the negro was being treated fairly. Was he 
being cheated out of his freedom, his liberty? 
Out of this came our Civil War. Our President, 
Abraham Lincoln, issued the Emancipation 
Proclamation and led this country in its fight 
for the liberty of all. 

Then when the World Wars occurred, we 
fought the powers that were imposing on the 
liber ty of the United States and that of other 
nations. We proved to ourselves and to the 
world that liberty is worth fighting for. It is 
worth defending with our lives. Liberty is some- 
thing which cannot be torn from the hearts 
and minds of our people. We need liberty. We 
do not use it carelessly. We do not do exactly 
as we please for that would mean infringing 
upon the liberties of others. 

Our country is becoming the one described by 
Aristotle when he said, "If liberty and equality, 
as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found 
in democracy, they will be best attained when 
all persons alike share in the government to the 
utmost." This is a country worth being proud 
of and defended. 

To people of other lands ours is one to be 
cherished, a country to be looked to for help. 
The peoples of war-torn Europe look to us for 
help of every kind. At the present time the in- 
scription on the Statue of Liberty is very mean- 
ingful. 

Give me your tired, your poor, 
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, 
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore, 
Send these, the homeless, tempest tossed to me; 
I lift my lamp beside the golden door. 

Emma Lazarus 
By Shirley Nichols '48 

FIREPLACE MEMORIES 

Grandmother sits at the old fireplace, 
Gracefully tatting her old-fashioned lace. 
She thinks about days that were long, long ago. 
When she was quite young and had many a 
beau. 

Well, first there was Bob, quite handsome and 

slick, 
He called her his "gal," but that didn't click. 
They often went out to an old country dance, 
She never did care for his kind of romance. 



20 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



There was Frcbin, John, and Tommy, and Paul, 
But for one of them she never could fall. 
None of them had either pep or great charm. 
She decided she wanted to live on a farm. 

The one she picked out to be my dear gramp, 
Could always be trusted without any lamp. 
He was quiet, ambitious, courageous, but shy, 
There was always a twinkle that gleamed in his 
eye. 

I wonder if when I'm old and gray, 

I'll sit by the hearth and tat away, 

I will watch each flame rise up to the flue, 

And recall romances, I had known too. 

Murilyn Graves '51 

WHAT IS IT? 
A pond of lilies, 

So large and flat. 
It gives you the willies, 

One look at that 

A single rose 

So tall and thin. 
To tickle your noses 

And disgrace your kin. 

A profusion of silk. 

So plaid and long, 
As white as milk, 

As gay as a song. 

Quite small you see, 

But large and flat. 
What can it be? 

Oh! an Easter hat. 

Jane Smith '51 



Sonnets have been written of apple blossoms, 

rain 
Great theories have been written by professor> 

proved and vain. 
But there is one great problem which grown- 

ups cannot solve 
And that is: "Just what are modern young 

folks made of" 

Boogie-woogie, crooners, bubble gum, jalopies 
Boys in messy sport clothes, girl in shirts and 

sloppies - - - 
Movie heroes, bicyclo. tutti-frutti sundaes, 

on Mondays - - - 
Staying up the night before, skipping school 



Radio turned up - - oh, so loud! - - records 

made by Frankie - - - 
Names of every friend and foe written on a 

hanky. 
Telephone calls five hours long, lots of puppy 

love - - - 
Dungarees and plaid shirts - - - That's what 

young folks are made of. 

But if grown-ups think that we re uncouth - - - 

Just when will adults learn the truth. 

And realize what they look like to youth?! 

For this is what they're made of ! 

Soap operas, horror movies, silly modes of fash- 
ion, 

Singing commercials, mysteries, bands — loud 
and crashin' - - - 

Night clubs, dancing, sleeping until noon, 

Worrying about the diet that they'll have to go 
on soon. 

Worrying about money, business, or a bill - - - 

Relaxing and enjoying life is absolutely nil! 

Hurrying and arguing are what they seem to 
love - - - 

And that, my friends, is what grown-ups arc 
made of. 

You see, it's not the fault of young folks 
That people think they're queer - - - 

For after all 

It's becoming grown-ups that they have to fear. 

Ann Sabo '50 



THE LEAP FROM THE DIVING BOARD 

The last year of high school is the spring- 
board to your future. What kind of a leap are 
you going to take^ 

After spending all your life climbing these 
twelve steps, now that you have reached the 
diving board, it is time to take the leap. Stop 
and think. Say to yourself. "Shall I jump from 
here, or shall I climb farther?" 

Suddenly you remember that before you can 
leap off the diving-board there are four more 
Steps to take. You believe that you have used 
enough time getting this far, and you are anx- 
ious to get in. Again you look back over th- 
twelve steps that you have already taken and 
say to yourself, "If I leap into life now. I won't 
do too badly because not everyone has had the 
-trength to climb this high." 

You cannot pause here very long. You must 
make a decision. What will you do? Take the 
I foui Steps or leap here? 

Anonymous 



THE TATT L ER 



21 



Tattler Staff 




Front Row left to right — N. Dunphy, V. Fraser, M. Williams, J. Demerski 

Back Row left to right — R. Durbin, T. LaCourse, E. Loomis, P. Ingellis, R. Wells, A. LeDuc, 
H. Tiley 



The Tattler is our year book. 

It's printed every year, 
By the members of the high school 

While the faculty stands near. 



THE TATTLER 



Of course we'll find our debating team 
Of whom we are so proud, 

Their fame we would like to shout 
In voices high and loud. 



In the front part of the year book 

Is the graduating class; 
The very finest pictures 

Of every lad and lass. 



Then, too, we find the basketball teams 
They're not roo large you'll see; 

And then the staff of the Revue, 
A magazine for you and me. 



But the other classes you will find 

In groups so well portraying 
The way they look each school day bright, 

Their private hopes betraying. 



Not to forget the staff of this 
Whose hard and patient work 

Has made this book just 

What it is. No one his dutv will shirk. 



Reprinted from 1947 Tattler 



1 ) 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Wexue otail 




Front Row left to right — E. Loomis, M. Williams, S. Nichols. A. Sabo. A. LeDuc, R. Merritt, 
B. Outhuse, M. Johnson, I. Ferron. M. Sanderson 

Back Row left to right — P. Morin, T. LaCourse. N. Dunphy. V. Fra^er, P. Ingellis. J. Demerski, 
A. Sincage. E. Outhuse, J. Bachand, S. Shumway. R. Wells 



Editor-in-chief 


Ann LeDuc 


Alumni 


Marion Johnson 


rant 


Ruth Merritt 


Artist 


Anne Sabo 


Literary editor 


Barbara Outhuse 


Assistant 


Elaine Outhuse 


News and Announcements 


Marilyn Williams 


Exchange 


Ruth Wells 


rant 


Shirley Shumway 


Circulation 


Viola J. Fraser, Theresa LaCourse 


Book and Movie Reviews 


Palma Ingellis 




Anna Mae Sincage, Joan Bachand 


Fashions 


Shirley Nichols 


Typ 


Shirley Nichols, Theresa LaCourse 


Campus Capers 


Nancy Dunphy 




Mae Sanderson, Irene Ferron 


:ant 


Esther Loomis 




Esther Loomis. June Demerski 


Sports 


Philip Morin 


Faculty Advisors Mrs. Grinnell. Miss Skrivars 



A food sale sponsored by the staff was held 
at the First National Store to raise funds for the 
necessary expenses of the school paper. THE 
RENTE. Due to the lack of funds and the in- 
creased cost of paper, the staff found it Deces- 
sary to curtail the number of issues. 

The contents of this paper cor- 
mostly of the literary work of the students 
and the high school news. Fashions, Campus 



Caper-. Mbvk and Book Reviews. Interv: 
Sports. Opinion Section, Exchange, and Alumni 
Notes have also been featured in the paper. 

The staff is indebted to Mrs. Grinnell and 
Mi" Skrivars for their kind co-operation as 
faculty advisors of THE RENTE. 

The student body should endeavor to contri- 
bute to the school paper, and aid the staff to 
make each issue a sue. 



THE TATTLER 



23 



Forensic League 




Front Row left to right — A. Sabo, V. Fraser, M. Williams, B. Outhuse 
Back Row left to right — D. Tiley, D. Brewer, M. Graves, A. Clary 



Our Forensic League was rather depleted 
this year with just enough members to make up 
two varsity and two junior varsity teams. The 
loss of Miss Webber as coach was compensated 
by the appointment of Raymond Williamson to 
that position. 

The debating season was opened at Amherst 
High School on October 12, 1947 when the 
Connecticut Valley Debating League held a se-. 
ries of trial debates to get acquainted with the 
new debating question and some of the new" de- 
baters. This year was the first time that these 
originally non competitive debates were judged 
to give Forensic League members a chance to 
gain extra points. Each vaisity team lost and 
won a debate at this meeting. 

The debate question for this year was — 
Resolved: "That the Federal Government should 
require arbitration of labor disputes in all basic 
American industries." In the ten competitive 
debates this year, Williamsburg came out a little 
lower than usual. With Viola Fraser and Anne 
Sabo as the Varsity Affirmative Team and Mari- 
lyn Williams and Barbara Outhuse as Varsity 



Negative, eight debates were lost and only two 
were won, both by the affirmative team. 

The majority of the junior varsity debates 
were judged this year which gave the new de- 
baters added assurance and experience to use in 
the future. 

Murilyn Graves, Dorothy Brewer, David 
Tiley, Arthur Clary, and Anne Sabo attended 
the Student Model Congress held at Northamp- 
ton High School on March 20, accompanied 
by Mr. Williamson. Arthur Clary's Bill in the 
House of Representatives was rejected and Anne 
Sabo's Senate bill was passed. The Model Con- 
gress was a new and interesting experience for 
all W.H.S. students who attended. 

In an assembly program June 4, Marilyn 
Williams received the Degree of Excellence; 
Degrees of Honor were received by Barbara 
Outhuse and Anne Sabo; Degrees of Merit 
were awarded to Arthur Clary, Viola Fraser, 
and Murilyn Graves. 

At the end of the year, Dorothy Brewer, 
Barbara Outhuse, and Anne Sabo gave declam- 
ations for the Williamsburg Grange. 



24 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Pro \ lerilo 




First Row — S. Nichols, D. Shumway, M. Sroczek, M. Williams 
Second Row — V. Fraser, J. Demerski, B. Outhuse, R. Merritt 



Our Pro Merito Society, a State Honor Society for students with an average of 85 or higher, 
has a membership of three Juniors and five Seniors. The Juniors are: Ruth Merritt, Doris Shum- 
way, and Mary Sroczek. Viola Fraser, June Demerski, Barbara Outhuse, Shirley Nichols, and 
Marilyn Williams are the Seniors. 

A zone meeting held at Easthampton in October was attended by six members accompanied 
by Miss Dunphy. 

A state meeting held at Technical High School, Springfield, in May, was attended by four 
members accompanied by Miss Dunphy. It was of special interest to every one since it was at 
this meeting that a tribute was paid to Dr. Charles Cockayne who will retire soon. It has been 
through his untiring interest and enthusiasm that this society has grown to what it is today. 



THE TATTLER 



25 



Doljs LJasketball 




Front Row — R. McCord, R. Morin, P. Morin Back Row — Coach Eaton, H. Tiley, R. Warner 



This year the Williamsburg High School boys were very fortunate in being directed in 
athletics by Wilbur Eaton, a fine leader. The players showed their respect for their coach, by a 
faithful turnout at practice, and by displaying the result of good direction, even in the hands of 
defeat. As has been the case in years past, the team has been hampered by the lack of practice 
time. 

Several underclassmen reported for basketball this year showing great promise for a vie 
torious 1949 basketball team. Despite the various handicaps, which the team worked so hard 
and faithfully to overcome, it attained a high standing in the field of sportsmanship of which, 
this school should be very proud. 

Howard Tiley 



Girls' Basketball 

This year Williamsburg High School again started a girls' basketball team for the first 
time in several years. There were a great many that teported to Doris Skrivars, who did a fine 
job with the team and gave up much of her spare time to work with them. Not one of the girls 
had ever played against competition before, and the result was a series of losses. But after each 
performance the team became more experienced until finaliy, in the last game of the season, they 
came up with a victory. This, of course, proved one thing: the team had the ability, but not the 
experience, and there is no question that the 1949 girls' basketball team will be labeled a success. 

Howard Tiley 



26 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



v^irls Dasketball 




First Row — A. Sincage, Joan Baldwin, Jeanette Baldwin, D. Golash, J. Bachand, A. Sears 
Second Row — L. Richardson, M. Black, D. Shumway, Coach Skrivars, J. Demerski, V. Fraser 



L^heeplead 



ers 




A Sincage, J. Morin, J Harlow, R. Ice 



THE TATT LER 



27 



BaseUI T 



cam 




First Row — C. Warner, C. Mollison, H. Warner, E. Richardson, A. Papineau, J. Maggs, 
R. Morin, H. Nye, P. Morin, R. Durbin, A. Warner, R. Warner, H. Tiley, G. Sears 



V7IGG C_ylub 




Front Row left to right — R. Bisbee, A. Barker, M. Johnson, M. Wells, J. Colson, I. Roberge, 

A. Sincage, A. Curtis, N. Dunphy, T. LaCourse. 
Second Row left to right — S. Nichols, A. Sabo, A. LeDuc, D. Shumway, R. Merritt, A. Sears, 

M. Graves, E. Loomis. 
Third Row left to right — R. Ice, M. Black, S. Magdalenski, S. Shumway, V. Fraser, E. Outhuse, 

J. Harlow, J. Smith, L. Barnas 



28 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



UaLjs ot Uup Youth 




THE T ATT L ER 



29 



Junior V^ 



rom 




Identification 



1. Ruth Wells, Viola Fraser, Palma In- 
gellis, Marilyn Williams and Barbara 
Outhuse. 

2. June Demerski 

3. Ruth Wells 

4. Viola Fraser 

5. Ruth Wells 

6. Barbara Outhuse 

7. Shirley Nichols 



30 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Alumni \o\ 



ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President Clarence Larkin 

Vice President Margaret Trainor 

Secretary Jean Hemenway 

Treasurer Mrs. Eleanor Ballvvay 

Executive Committee 

George Munson Robert Nash 

Elizabeth Burke Norma Wells Packard 

Marion Sylvester Holman Frank Soltys 



GS 

Frederick Healy Jr. "44 to Helen Baldelli 
Lena Niewiadomski '35 to George McCarthy 
Faith Dresser '41 to John Schulze 
Mary Lena Guyette '4 2 to Francis Batura 
Richard Bates '39 to Arleen Struthers 
Dorothy Joyal Lovato '38 to George Caroll 
June Bowkcr '41 to Robert Newell '41 
Ma ion Sylvester '44 to Leroy Holman 
Helen Augusta Emerson '35 to Julius Bohne 
Norma Wells '43 to Arthur Packard 
Frank Munson '43 to Ernestine Warren 
Norman Bates '44 to Mildred Duffy 



BIRTHS 

Betty Lou Harlow Sylvester '43 — a daughter 

Marcia Ingellis Calabrate '40 — a daughter 

Frederick Allen '41 — a son 

Vernon Russell '3 5 — a son 

Janice Wells Banister '39 — a son 

Charles Allen Bisbee, Jr. '35- -a son 

Winthrop Stone '40 — a daughter 

Clary Snow '29 a son 

Lewis Black '23 — a daughter 

Phyllis Rhoades Doyle "45 — a daughter 

Audrey Jones Marvel '42 — a son 

Celia Soltys Watling '42 — a son 

Lillian Blanchard Breen '37 — a daughter 

Richard Culver '41 — a daughter 

Marion Culver Atkins '43 — a son 

Norma Wells Packard '43 — a daughter 

Martha Deane Townson '44 — a son 

Warren Gould '39 — a son 

Janet Hillenbrand Delnero '47 — a son 

George Judd '3 3 — a daughter 

Frederick Healy, Jr. '44 — a daughter 



MARRIAGES 

Thomas Coogan, Jr. "38 to Felixa Helen Sieruta 
June Colburn '43 to William Gaylord, Jr. 
Janet Hillenbrand '47 to Stephen Delnero, Jr. 
Eva Jane Sanderson '45 to Leon Atkins 
Agnes Matrishon '44 to Alfred Cone 
Laura Bisbee Deane '15 to Robert Parks 
Rowena Nye '47 to Vardic Golash '36 
Dorothy Stimpson '42 to Donald Harry '44 



DEATHS 
Mrs. Elizabeth Dunphy Gusetti '20 

CLASS OF 1947 

Shirley Payne — student nurse at the Cooley 
Dickinson Hospital. 

Theodora Harlow — employed at Woolworth's 
store in Northampton. 

Janet Hillenbrand--married to Stephen Delne- 
ro, Jr. and living in Leeds. 

Rowena Nye — married to Vardic Golash and 
living in Georgia. 

Florence Beals — attending Northampton Com- 
mercial College. 

Barbara Dymerski — employed at Snow's Ice 
Cream Bar in Northampton. 

Floyd Merritt — attending Amherst College. 

Frank Collins — working in Boston and attend- 
ing night school at Northeastern University. 

Robert Smith — attending Mount St. Charles 
Academy, Woonsocket, Rhode Island. 

David LeDuc — farming at home. 

Elizabeth Brooks- attending Bay Path Institute, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Dorthy Carver — doing domestic work in Cum- 
mington. 

Doris Graves Student Nurse at the Lynn Hos- 
pital, Lynn, Mass. 

Harriet Ice — employed at McCallum's Hosiery 
in Northampton. 

By Ann LeDuc 

Alumni Editor 



THE TATT L ER 



31 



Autograph 



Compliments 



of 



Northampton Street Railway Co. 



EDWARD A. PELLISSIER 
Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 



SERVING WILLIAMSBURG 



American International College 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

"Specializing in Preparing Youth for Citizenship" 

Established 1885 Enrollment over 1300 

Recognized by American Council of Education 

and 
American Medical Association 

AIC is: Non-Sectarian — Co-Educational 

AIC has: No quota or priority system 

DIVISION OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Bachelor of Arts Degree 

DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Bachelor of Business Administration Degree 

One of the most progressive institutions of higher learning 
in this area, American International College meets the require- 
ments that the high school graduate of today desires — a genuine 
spirit of friendliness, an eye to the future, and a curriculum which 
places emphasis on preparation for citizenship. 

For further information wrue to 

MISS ESTHER D. FRARY, Registrar 
20 Amaron Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Telephone 7-5331 



Compliments of 
MacDonald's Shoe Shop 

185 Main Street 
Northampton 


HARLOW'S 

LUGGAGE REPAIRS 

Bill Folds - Toilet Kits 
Expert Locksmith 

18 Center St. Tel. 115-W 
Northampton 


For the young fellow who grad- 
uates this year we have every- 
thing that he needs for this im- 
portant occasion. 

Merritt Clark & Co. 

Northampton 


WARD MTT.T.ER 

Westinghouse & Norge 
Refrigerators 

York Boiler Burner Units 

Oil Burners & Service 

HOME INSULATION 

14 Center St. Tel. 2123-R 
Northampton 


Congratulations and continual 
success in the future. This is 
the wish of the leading men's 
and boy's wear store of Hamp- 
shire County. 

Harry Daniel Associates 

Northampton 


Herman A. Cohn Phone 1426 

THE FAIR STORE 

Women's, Men's 

and 
Children's Wear 

SHOES 
27-29 Pleasant St., Northampton 


W. FC 
Northampton ( 

186 Main Street 


)STER 
Camera Store 

Tel. 1040 



Best Wishes 

To 
Class of '48 

WILLIAMSBURG FUEL & ICE 
COMPANY 



Compliments of 



Collins Plumbing Supply Co. 



Compliments of 

R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

Landscaping and Tree Service 

WILLIAMSBURG 
Telephone 2 1 1 Old Goshen Road 


Compliments of 
F. N. Graves & Son 

Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

Hickey's Ice Cream Bar 

Bridge St. Haydenville 

Cigarettes - Magazines 

Cigars - Newspapers 

LaSALLE'S ICE CREAM 


Compliments of 

RAY'S LUNCH 

Homemade Donuts Daily 

Williamsburg 
Main St. Tel. 249 


j. f. McAllister 

ESSO SERVICENTER 

Gasoline - Motor Oil 

Tires 

Batteries - Accessories 

Route 9 Haydenville 


Compliments of 

HATHAWAY & CULVER 
Lumber 

Tel. 219 Williamsburg, Mass. 



Youngstown Kitchens — Chrysler Oil Heating 
Crane and Standard Plumbing — G. E. Dishwashers 

J. J. DEYETTE CO. 

35 State St. Tel. 193-W 



BUICK Authorized Sales & Service 

JOHN C. STRUBBE 

Telephone Northampton 456 
Complete Motor Analysis and Tune Up 

Latest Model Used Cars Body and Fender Work 

NORTHAMPTON BUICK CO. 



Compliments of 



McCallum's 



150-154 MAIN STREET 



NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 

TODD'S 

Tel. 150 
Main St. Northampton 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



COLONIAL CLEANERS 

QUALITY CLEANING — DYING 

WEEKLY PICKUP — DELIVERY SERVICE 

Carl Sylvester <S Harrison A. Fisher 

4 Main Street Tel. 247 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

W. E. Kellogg and Son 

DAIRY AND POULTRY PRODUCTS 
Tel. 3631 Williamsburg 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

GET OUR PRICES ON EVERYTHING YOU NEED 
Tel. Williamsburg 271 and Chesterfield 2145 



Compliments of 
R. F. BURKE 

Williamsburg 



Williamsburg Garage 

C. K. Hathaway 
Tel. 4351 

SERVICE STATION 
Ice Cream - Candy - Cigars 

Williamsburg 



SOCONY SERVICE STATION 

Dial 275 . 
Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

PACKARD'S SODA SHOPPE 


WAR BONDS 

and 

STAMPS 

WILLIAMSBURG 
POST OFFICE 


For the Best in 
COLPROVIA DRIVEWAYS 

Russell V. Loomis 

Haydenville 
Call Williamsburg 4558 


Compliments of 

REARDON BROS. 

Haydenville 


Compliments of 

THE HAYDENVILLE 
BARBER SHOP 



O. T. DEWHURST 

OPTOMETRISTS and OPTICIANS 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing 
eyes which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent 
defects in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. 
A little foresight now may help them in their studies. Let us 
examine their eyes. 

201 Main St. Telephone 184-W Northampton 



Go To BRANDLE'S First 

To Save Time and Trouble For Your 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

Main Street Northampton 

Compliments of 

King's Paint & Paper Store 

157 Main Street Northampton 

HANDICRAFT SHOP 

GRADUATION AND WEDDING GIFTS 

Jewelry Handkerchiefs Baby Things 

Handmade Articles 

179 Main Street Phone 3690 Northampton 

Compliments of 

Packard-Northampton, Inc. 

141 King Street Tel. 1369-W 

Northampton, Mass. 



E. J. GARE & SON 


Founded 1785 


BRONZE WAR MEMORIALS 


SILVERWARE 


112 Main Street Northampton 


RUBY'S 


Furniture Stores, Inc. 


15 Bridge Street Tel. 3519 


Northampton 


Paints - Wallpaper 


ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 


Glass - Artist's Supplies 


PURSEGLOVE'S 


Pierce's Paint Store 


15 State Street 


196 Main St. Northampton 


Northampton 




Compliments and 


Compliments of 


Best Wishes to the 


COHEN BROS. 


CLASS OF 1948 


% 


JACK AUGUST 


Northampton 


Northampton 



Headquarters For Everything Electric 
SALES and SERVICE 

Nothing Too Small or Too Large 

All Work Done By Experts 

We Repair All Radios and Electrical Appliances 

PARSON'S ELECTRIC SHOP 

28 Center Street Phone 1307 

Northampton, Mass. 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 



CHILSON'S SHOP 

W. Leroy Chilson 

Furniture Coverings and Upholstering Supplies 
Awnings — Venetian Blinds 

Furniture Upholstering — Window Shades 

Automobile Plate 6c Safety Glass - Truck Covers <S Canvas Goods 

Slip Covers, Cushions Auto Tops and Upholstery 

34 Center Street Northampton 



CERRUTI'S 

Jewelers - Engravers 
Watchmakers 

Northampton 



The James P. Flynn 
Pharmacy 

24 Main St. Telephone 856 

Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 

C. E. JENKINS 

Stationery - Greeting Cards - Medicines 

ICE CREAM 

Williamsburg, Mass. 



PLEASANT TIME SHOP 

Watches Rings Diamonds 

Expert Watch Repairing 



83 Pleasant Street 



Northampton 



Compliments of 



WILLIAMSBURG BLACKSMITHS 



HULCREST FARM 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 

Single Comb 
RHODE ISLAND REDS 

Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 

Williamsburg 



BEEBE'S LUNCH 

A Good Place To Eat 
Ice Cream & Beverages 

Berkshire Trail Haydenville 

A. T. Beebe, Prop. 



Compliments of 




A FRIEND 




Compliments of 




THE HAYDENVILLE COMPANY 






Compliments of 




Compliments of 


MR. EATON 




A. J. POLMATER 


Coach of Athletics 
and 






Physical Education 





Herbs and Annals 

Choice Perennials 

for 

Rock Garden and Border 

HOUSE PLANTS 

Village Hill Nursery 

Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

THE CLARY FARM 

Try Our Maple Syrup 
For Farm and Village Property 

Consult 

SILAS SNOW 

Tel. 3563 Williamsburg 


Compliments of 

CLASS OF '50 


Compliments of 
JONES THE FLORIST 

Haydenville 
Tel. 4331 —4332 


Compliments of 

EARL R. HERRICK 
Camera Portraits 

Northampton, Mass. 

• 



Compliments of 



SNYDER'S EXPRESS 



WORTHINGTON, MASS. 



Compliments of 
J. R. Mansfield & Son 

FUNERAL HOME 

South Main Street 
Haydenville 



Compliments of 

CLASS OF '49 



Compliments of 

GUSETTI'S 

Haydenville 



Compliments of 

CLASS OF '51 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Compliments of 
A FRIEND 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


LINEKIN BAY CAMPS 

Booth Bay Harbor, Maine 

On the ocean front in Maine's 
beautiful Boothbay Region. 
Boating, sailing, fishing, swim- 
ming, tennis, horseback riding, 
marvelous Maine meals, sea 
food and lobster, all included 
in rate. Near golf course, sum- 
mer theatre, movies and 
churches. 


Tel. 3850 

Sincage Printing Company 

Northampton 



Compliments of 



WILLIAMS HOUSE 



Williamsburg